Author Topic: The price of a Fairlight CMI  (Read 12801 times)

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Wheat Williams

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The price of a Fairlight CMI
« on: August 14, 2009, 01:27:22 PM »
Trevor Horn is on record as saying that he payed £18,000 for his first Fairlight. Assuming that was 1980, that would be about £57,830 in today's British Pounds Sterling. On this side of the pond, it was about $35,000 in 1980 and that would be $91,500 today.

Peter Vogel has posted as an estimate that his new Fairlight CMI will cost US $17,000 for the machine and $2,000 for the keyboard. Seems like a bargain, no?
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Rob Puricelli

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2009, 02:45:47 PM »
Whilst I take your point that comparatively, the 30A is cheaper than the IIx or III were in their heyday, I wouldn't use the word bargain ;)

US$17K in today's current financial climate is a large sum of money in anybody's book, especially for a piece of music making equipment. Now, don't get me wrong, I'm not slating the estimated price point as I fully understand the cost of the CC-1 and it's associated hardware and software. But I have to admit that my heart truly sank when Peter revealed the estimated cost of the 30A.

Why? Well, as a long time fan of the Fairlight, I have dreamed long and hard about one day owning one. Knowing that, before now, it would only be possible with a used IIx or III which still sell for £5000 on eBay, I started exploring other possibilities to attain that Fairlight sound. Sadly, there are not that many samples of the Fairlight, and those that do exist, aren't that great. And as we all know, the construction of the Fairlight colours it's output in such a unique fashion that can only be achieved in a Fairlight.

And so, I have always dreamed of some answer to the dream of a poor man's Fairlight, if you will. Maybe if the 30A sells out and demand far outstrips supply, Peter will consider further versions which may be reduced in price.

It's something that will be interesting to observe over the coming months and years.

One thought though. Maybe Fairlight can sample a 30A, with all it's factory library and 3rd party offerings and release that as a universal library for the common man. I know that many thousands of bedroom muso's would forego the 100% accuracy in exchange for near faithful recreations of those classic sounds.

These are interesting times ;)

Rob
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charlieclouser

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2009, 09:33:44 PM »
Mmmm.  Price for new system = high, yes.  But appeal of original cosmetics and hardware quirks = infinite.

I've passed on a couple original CMI systems at $10k-ish, because I've got enough 30-year old gear and certainly don't want to be searching ebay for 8-inch floppies or spare chips.

If it were only a PCI card with an AudioUnit plug-in, priced at $5k, maybe it would sell more units, but how many more, even at that price?  And would I want one?  Sure, but not like I want the big Jetsons-looking beast with the green screen!

I fully approve of the El Gigante rack unit, clacky qwerty keyboard, and most importantly, the trapezoidal green glass crt with coily-cable lightpen... that's a MUST.  I can't believe new examples are still in stock somewhere... or are there still plenty left over in the back room at Fairlight HQ?  ;)

Anyway, count me in.  The directness, simplicity, and more importantly, the RESULTS I brought home from my few forays into Page R on rented systems made an indelible impression on me in the eighties, and being a "samplist" first and foremost, the CMI holds a special place in my heart.

The space-age casework and Apollo-era screen graphics are design purity on a sublime level, like a Ford GT-40 or a Dieter Rams stereo.  If I can get a fresh example, powered by a mass overkill DSP engine, it's a done deal.  Unlike a vintage original system, this one might outlast me!

Now.  Who's going to do a clone of the PPG Realizer, in the original blue "launch control" form factor?  :)

As to wishlist:

Hardware:

- It would be convenient to have at least a stereo pair of AES or SPDIF outs in addition to the MADI.  Did I miss that on the spec sheet?

- I hesitate to hope for nifty uses for the USB port besides storing samples on a memory stick... but it would be great to see the CMI-30a show up as a class-compliant MIDI interface when plugged into a host computer via USB, displaying multiple MIDI ports that mirror each of its hardware ports (or not), letting you send MIDI tracks from another computer via direct USB connection.

- Along those lines, it would be great to be able to mount the CMI-30a drive via USB on a host computer for sample transfer, as you can with the Roland V-Synth.  Plug in USB, hit some menu item on the instrument, and the drive shows up on the computer desktop.  Drag files, unmount drive, hit menu item on instrument to return to play mode.  Easier than swapping sticks.  If the CMI-30a will mount on a network, then strike this comment!

- Don't let me even start dreaming about an AudioUnit plugin that controls the CMI-30a over USB, allowing you to integrate it directly into your sequencer, as you can with the Access Virus TI (finally, after it not working for like two years...).  It would be too good to even hope for seeing the CMI-30a display mirrored inside an AudioUnit Instrument plugin that directly controls the CMI from the host sequencer via USB, with full MIDI and host sync support, and returns audio to the host mixer via the AU plugin......  So I won't even talk about stuff like that.

As to software wishes:

- As sexy as the lightpen is, I think we need an option to use a USB mouse or trackball to position the onscreen cursor...

- I would find it very useful to be able to quickly render or bounce whatever I'm hearing right from Page R into a stereo AIFF or WAV, for later import into Logic or whatever.  This way as you're jamming, but not ready to commit, you could grab 1-to-8 bar loops of whatever you're hearing with a quick keypress.  Then after you've got a few, use the USB connection I dreamt of above to drag them over to the Mac and drop them on a timeline.  Ideally this command should bounce whatever you're hearing, so if you've got a weird combination of tracks soloed, then that's what you'll get in the resulting file.

- I don't know if there are any internal effects planned (certainly the crystalcore has some DSP to spare to run a reverb or three?) but it would be cool to be able to do some basic effects send-return stuff right on the unit... either with onboard effects, or using spare outputs and the sample inputs to send+return to external devices.  It's often nice to jab some reverb and delays and whatnot right inside of a rhythm loop you're building without needing to print separated elements and apply individual effects in another workstation.  Plus, this way the effects (hopefully) return back into the submix BEFORE the "Fairlight Crunch™" is applied.  For all I know the CMI could always do this?

Just make sure the screen is green!

« Last Edit: August 14, 2009, 11:27:53 PM by charlieclouser »
jackin fools for beats since '82

ix studio

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2009, 01:55:47 AM »
i totally agree with everyone but i really feel its very sad this technology hasnt been ported to be widely accessible , yes card form or something , i know that totally misses the vibe of the hardware and is a large part of the vibe of working with the fairlight system but i cant help think it would be a huge success  , if you could port that fairlight sound into a pc  / mac i think it would be really cool and in a  way a really nice thing to see . I would like to see or hear if fairlight and peter plan on porting this to more lower budget artists as i myself am slowly trying to accumulate less and have a more minimal studio as are many others , it brings up the question whether the gear designers should accomodate the market or define their own and stick to that  on a  smaller scale , ive just longed for a nice pci ' pcie fairlight card for to long  , i have to say though i am really thinking  ' where can i get the money for this ! I dont think the new system is overpriced at all , its just like the original a system available to rich artists and wealthy people and that the shame of it ,  all fairlights sound work and character of their sampling technology is being limited to certain classes of people , the kids in one bedrooms studios should be able to work that fairlight magic and in all honesty chances are they would work it in ways that redefine fairlight into the next 20 years.Fairlight does need to be ported into a  pci card and i was kind of hoping that would be the new system in a  way or a tc electronic style 1u rack system , even 2 or 3 u but just a bit more accessible $ wise .Not knocking the beauty of the new system but feeling a  bit like such amazing sound technology should not be limited to the rich and famous in this day and age and to some degree it still will be , thats maybes fairlights persona though ' the rolls royce of sampling technologies' and maybe a dumbing down of it into  a ' working class ' system doesnt suit it on some level , sorry to get deep;) but i think itsa  shame when technology is limited to certain clases of people .I am amazed no one cloned the sound intoa  vsti sampler but i guess thats because the fairlights technology  / crystal core ? is un replicatable and a pc or mac simple cant function on that level.

matt

dvdborn

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2009, 03:47:47 AM »
I think it's import to remember that the main purpose of the new Fairlight will be a recreation of the classic Fairlight sound and interface including the sample libraries. As far as I'm concerned it doesn't need to have more bells & whistles than that. Updates (80 sequencer tracks,...) or bug fixes not withstanding.

The Series I,II & III already have proven to be excellent instruments that allows one to make inspiring music. I'd be much happier to have 16 Fairlight voices that sound excellent instead of having 100+ Kontakt/EXS24/... sampling voices.

If anyone wants Kyma functionality then they should buy a Kyma. If someone wants lots of different filters and modulation options they should buy a Mac, NI Kontakt and a good audio interface.

Do I really need one? I already have a Series IIx and an Emulator III so I'm all set. But these instruments won't survive another 20 years. So I'm hoping that by the time they need to be replaced I'll be able to replace them with a new Fairlight.

If I had the money I'd order one now. Unfortunately I don't.

James

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2009, 10:14:47 AM »
If someone wants lots of different filters and modulation options they should buy a Mac, NI Kontakt and a good audio interface.



At a 17000$ price tag, we could get a sotware  with modern sound processing . My series3/Mfx2 and IIX are collecting dust , why ? I' m fed up to transfer sound just to time stretch it. I' m fed up to slice the loops beat after beat. If only we could have a sort of variphrase inside this cmi, I would buy one . Adrian Bruce who worked on the Series 3 voice cards developed variphrase technology....
I work with music producers , they need to tweak the sounds in real time ( pitch+tempo ) . They have no time to wait for any transfer. They won' t accept to return 30 years earlier. Nowadays , the habits of producers are very very different . At last , if they want to play with the old strings or fairlight voices, I can use one of my old fairlights. No need for a 100 or 200 voices system   :'(

Musician

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2009, 11:02:31 PM »
Quote
Mmmm.  Price for new system = high, yes.  But appeal of original cosmetics and hardware quirks = infinite.

Yes, but more so, no. The original cosmetics looked great in the 80s but nowadays it would look old and dated by a long shot.
I would say to have a more modernized look for the cosmetics, fitting it more with today's studio environment & instruments.

Quote
I've passed on a couple original CMI systems at $10k-ish, because I've got enough 30-year old gear and certainly don't want to be searching ebay for 8-inch floppies or spare chips.

My thoughts exactly! Thats why I dont care for any XD/SD/compact flash or whatever card for use in a workstation system. Keep it at Ethernet/USB/FW which will last much longer !

Quote
If it were only a PCI card with an AudioUnit plug-in, priced at $5k, maybe it would sell more units, but how many more, even at that price?  And would I want one?  Sure, but not like I want the big Jetsons-looking beast with the green screen!

Indeed, even though I like the 80s I would not want the black/green screen all the time. I would like to switch between the 80s page R sequencer and a modern up to date DAW like sequencer screen, so both options included.

I seriously like the PCI card idea providing the sound engine, the processing power and all filters, shapers etc. that makes up the Fairlight sound.
Controllers one can buy plenty. We have DAW computers for the tasks of sample & sound management & archiving, sequencing ,some connectivity, and graphics display.
Its the sound engine AND the large samples libraries we need !

Quote
I fully approve of the El Gigante rack unit, clacky qwerty keyboard, and most importantly, the trapezoidal green glass crt with coily-cable lightpen... that's a MUST.  I can't believe new examples are still in stock somewhere... or are there still plenty left over in the back room at Fairlight HQ?  ;)

NO Green CRT screen please.
These days its all touchscreens and TFT/LCD screens. Why go back to that old shabby screen interface ?? NO. Not at all a MUST!
Fairlight should use a TFT screen with something like a Ritepen or alike. Or provide at least a VGA (HDMI ?) output for the user to connect a TFT screen and some pen/tablet to connect via USB.

Quote
Anyway, count me in.  The directness, simplicity, and more importantly, the RESULTS I brought home from my few forays into Page R on rented systems made an indelible impression on me in the eighties, and being a "samplist" first and foremost, the CMI holds a special place in my heart.

NO page R as the ONLY option for the sequencer.
Again, for the first half hour its fun and very retro feeling, but those were the 80s and NOW its 2009. Workflow needs to be fast and realtime ! People in the industry are a lot more demanding now than in those days.

Quote
The space-age casework and Apollo-era screen graphics are design purity on a sublime level, like a Ford GT-40 or a Dieter Rams stereo.  If I can get a fresh example, powered by a mass overkill DSP engine, it's a done deal.  Unlike a vintage original system, this one might outlast me!

Now.  Who's going to do a clone of the PPG Realizer, in the original blue "launch control" form factor?  :)

As to wishlist:

Hardware:

- It would be convenient to have at least a stereo pair of AES or SPDIF outs in addition to the MADI.  Did I miss that on the spec sheet?

I would say: at least 8 channels AES/EBU In and Out, MADI as an option card, 8 Analog Ins and Outs.

Quote
- I hesitate to hope for nifty uses for the USB port besides storing samples on a memory stick... but it would be great to see the CMI-30a show up as a class-compliant MIDI interface when plugged into a host computer via USB, displaying multiple MIDI ports that mirror each of its hardware ports (or not), letting you send MIDI tracks from another computer via direct USB connection.

Indeed. Even better: Any new Fairlight system would best just connect up to a computer DAW via Ethernet protocol, to be able to access a computer's intern and externally connected
harddrives. It would have a few USB ports for connection of a mouse/tablet, midi controllers and the occasional USB stick for fast transport of files and samples.

Quote
- Along those lines, it would be great to be able to mount the CMI-30a drive via USB on a host computer for sample transfer, as you can with the Roland V-Synth.  Plug in USB, hit some menu item on the instrument, and the drive shows up on the computer desktop.  Drag files, unmount drive, hit menu item on instrument to return to play mode.  Easier than swapping sticks.  If the CMI-30a will mount on a network, then strike this comment!

Yes, forget USB for networking to a computer environment. Maybe USB3 will allow this, I am not sure. But Ethernet protocol is proven, reliable, fast and easily expandable with a hub.
And OSC (new midi protocol) and EUCON (DAW support protocol by Euphonix) all go over Ethernet.

Quote
- Don't let me even start dreaming about an AudioUnit plugin that controls the CMI-30a over USB, allowing you to integrate it directly into your sequencer, as you can with the Access Virus TI (finally, after it not working for like two years...).  It would be too good to even hope for seeing the CMI-30a display mirrored inside an AudioUnit Instrument plugin that directly controls the CMI from the host sequencer via USB, with full MIDI and host sync support, and returns audio to the host mixer via the AU plugin......  So I won't even talk about stuff like that.

Would seriously rock indeed ! But a VST3 version would be required as well.

Quote
As to software wishes:

- As sexy as the lightpen is, I think we need an option to use a USB mouse or trackball to position the onscreen cursor...

The lightpen is old technology. Fairlight should not use it anymore in a new workstation (not minding the Anniversary edition).

Quote
- I would find it very useful to be able to quickly render or bounce whatever I'm hearing right from Page R into a stereo AIFF or WAV, for later import into Logic or whatever.  This way as you're jamming, but not ready to commit, you could grab 1-to-8 bar loops of whatever you're hearing with a quick keypress.  Then after you've got a few, use the USB connection I dreamt of above to drag them over to the Mac and drop them on a timeline.  Ideally this command should bounce whatever you're hearing, so if you've got a weird combination of tracks soloed, then that's what you'll get in the resulting file.

Thats one of the reasons we need a "modern" DAW like 'page R', so no greenish old page R like it used to be back then. Much more functionality quickly accessible onscreen is vital.

Quote
- I don't know if there are any internal effects planned (certainly the crystalcore has some DSP to spare to run a reverb or three?) but it would be cool to be able to do some basic effects send-return stuff right on the unit... either with onboard effects, or using spare outputs and the sample inputs to send+return to external devices.  It's often nice to jab some reverb and delays and whatnot right inside of a rhythm loop you're building without needing to print separated elements and apply individual effects in another workstation.  Plus, this way the effects (hopefully) return back into the submix BEFORE the "Fairlight Crunch™" is applied.  For all I know the CMI could always do this?

That should be possible if the CC1 has all that computing power.

Quote
Just make sure the screen is green!

But NOT as the ONLY choice !!

Musician

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2009, 11:06:30 PM »
i totally agree with everyone but i really feel its very sad this technology hasnt been ported to be widely accessible , yes card form or something , i know that totally misses the vibe of the hardware and is a large part of the vibe of working with the fairlight system but i cant help think it would be a huge success  , if you could port that fairlight sound into a pc  / mac i think it would be really cool and in a  way a really nice thing to see . I would like to see or hear if fairlight and peter plan on porting this to more lower budget artists as i myself am slowly trying to accumulate less and have a more minimal studio as are many others , it brings up the question whether the gear designers should accomodate the market or define their own and stick to that  on a  smaller scale , ive just longed for a nice pci ' pcie fairlight card for to long  , i have to say though i am really thinking  ' where can i get the money for this ! I dont think the new system is overpriced at all , its just like the original a system available to rich artists and wealthy people and that the shame of it ,  all fairlights sound work and character of their sampling technology is being limited to certain classes of people , the kids in one bedrooms studios should be able to work that fairlight magic and in all honesty chances are they would work it in ways that redefine fairlight into the next 20 years.Fairlight does need to be ported into a  pci card and i was kind of hoping that would be the new system in a  way or a tc electronic style 1u rack system , even 2 or 3 u but just a bit more accessible $ wise .Not knocking the beauty of the new system but feeling a  bit like such amazing sound technology should not be limited to the rich and famous in this day and age and to some degree it still will be , thats maybes fairlights persona though ' the rolls royce of sampling technologies' and maybe a dumbing down of it into  a ' working class ' system doesnt suit it on some level , sorry to get deep;) but i think itsa  shame when technology is limited to certain clases of people .I am amazed no one cloned the sound intoa  vsti sampler but i guess thats because the fairlights technology  / crystal core ? is un replicatable and a pc or mac simple cant function on that level.

matt

I hear you, Matt and I agree.
We live in another time and studios plus budgets are smaller.
On the other end technology has so much improved and computing power is so big on a much smaller footprint these days.
Eg. if SonicCore can produce the XIte1 with the rich processing environment it has, surely Fairlight can redefine their system as well ?

Musician

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2009, 11:09:31 PM »
I think it's import to remember that the main purpose of the new Fairlight will be a recreation of the classic Fairlight sound and interface including the sample libraries. As far as I'm concerned it doesn't need to have more bells & whistles than that. Updates (80 sequencer tracks,...) or bug fixes not withstanding.

The Series I,II & III already have proven to be excellent instruments that allows one to make inspiring music. I'd be much happier to have 16 Fairlight voices that sound excellent instead of having 100+ Kontakt/EXS24/... sampling voices.

If anyone wants Kyma functionality then they should buy a Kyma. If someone wants lots of different filters and modulation options they should buy a Mac, NI Kontakt and a good audio interface.

Do I really need one? I already have a Series IIx and an Emulator III so I'm all set. But these instruments won't survive another 20 years. So I'm hoping that by the time they need to be replaced I'll be able to replace them with a new Fairlight.

If I had the money I'd order one now. Unfortunately I don't.

I also agree. Fairlight needs to keep the system inspiring to work with, but forget the extra bells and whistles if the system has not THE sound and THE processing of the original system at least. The user can always expand with other systems like Kyma.
But thats why I would say to Fairlight to make extra functionality a la Kyma sound processing and more available as software expansion options just to upload into the CC core after purchase.

Musician

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2009, 11:10:20 PM »
If someone wants lots of different filters and modulation options they should buy a Mac, NI Kontakt and a good audio interface.



At a 17000$ price tag, we could get a sotware  with modern sound processing . My series3/Mfx2 and IIX are collecting dust , why ? I' m fed up to transfer sound just to time stretch it. I' m fed up to slice the loops beat after beat. If only we could have a sort of variphrase inside this cmi, I would buy one . Adrian Bruce who worked on the Series 3 voice cards developed variphrase technology....
I work with music producers , they need to tweak the sounds in real time ( pitch+tempo ) . They have no time to wait for any transfer. They won' t accept to return 30 years earlier. Nowadays , the habits of producers are very very different . At last , if they want to play with the old strings or fairlight voices, I can use one of my old fairlights. No need for a 100 or 200 voices system   :'(

Very true indeed !

Kristien

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2009, 09:43:26 PM »
I Think that if you want the best then it has to reflect in the price of anything. Even at $17,000 i think that is very good value for a top-spec product. Ok, so computer-based music is all around us, but Fairlight were pioneers in that medium, and even now, Fairlight ESP continues to make inovative products like the Xynergie controller. All of this state of the art technology doesn't come cheap for the manufacturers and as such, the cost has to be high to maintain the dominance in this ever increasing musical instrument market.

Peter and the Fairlight instruments team are doing their best to produce a product that will be able to produce a kind of 'Fairlight IIX / III' of the new millenium and if i had the money, i'd buy a few of them to do music in my studio, like 'The Art of Noise' did on their Fairlight-dominated albums of the 80s / 90s.  

Its nice to have Fairlight instruments back in business and i for one fully support Peter and the team 100 percent and i truly believe at any price, it's better to have a new Fairlight CMI than to not have a new one, and so i look foreward to seeing and hearing about the new product developments
« Last Edit: September 02, 2009, 09:45:06 PM by Kristien »

Peter Vogel

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2009, 03:09:59 AM »
What is a Ritepen?

The CMI-30A will use an LCD monitor, not CRT, and a 'lightpen' which will have the same function as the original lightpen but technology-wise will be a stylus activating a touch screen.

Peter

dpasdernick

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #12 on: December 16, 2010, 08:35:58 AM »
I wonder if my interest in the new Fairlight is purely for nostalgic reasons. As with the Synclav I sure a lot of us drooled over the Fairlight's capabilities. back then there was nothing comparable. Plus the look was outstanding (and still is to me). I have bought a few software samples (Cult Sampler, Nostalgia from Zero -G) that include samples of the Fairlight. I am often amazed at, and forgive me for this, how poor some of the sounds are. While back in the 80's a popped bass sound was remarkable on a sampler today's VST like Trillian blow it away. We all think back to the Kate Bush, Trevor Horn, Peter Gabriel masterpieces and maybe we think "I could do that if i had a Fairlight". But those songs are much more than the Fairlight itself. These songs are beautifully arranged, great lyrics, fantastic "real live" players as well.

Don't get me wrong. I am thinking the new CMI maybe my midlife crisis investment (forget the Corvette) I applaud Peter and his team for bringing it back. I just hope that it is more than what it was because after a few days of grinning like an idiot over playing the Arrrr sound I think I would start doing the math on all the musical arsenal I could have bought for 17k.

No disrespect meant at all to the Fairlight team. They are all Gods in my book and made the world a way better place with their innovation. I guess my point is, are we hoping to buy back a piece of our youth, or a new instrument that will elevate our music to a higher level in today's modern times?

Respectfully,

Darren

PS Additional thoughts: You can now buy the Korg M1 complete with all of the expansion cards and sounds for $49.00. Same for the Wavestation. Oberheim OB 8? Around $100. All in software. All sound great, all dirt cheap. Where we born in the wrong era? ;-)
« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 12:52:28 PM by dpasdernick »

sweep

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2010, 03:58:45 AM »
We all think back to the Kate Bush, Trevor Horn, Peter Gabriel masterpieces and maybe we think "I could do that if i had a Fairlight". But those songs are much more than the Fairlight itself. These songs are beautifully arranged, great lyrics, fantastic "real live" players as well.

I think this hits the nail on the head. At the time many people thought they could sound like top professional musicians if they had a Fairlight, and overlooked the talent that got those musicians to the top in the first place.

And there were people who had a Fairlight and did nothing of note with it, names we've forgotten or never knew.

Personally I'm attracted to the new Fairlight to make new music and I've no interest in almost all of the `classic Fairlight' people. With the honourable exception of Kate Bush I didn't like any of them anyway, and I've no plans to sound like Kate Bush.

If I had a lot of available cash I'd order a new Fairlight. Unfortunately I haven't, but past experience has shown me that some of the instruments I look at admiringly do come my way eventually, so I keep an eye on things.

I must say I'm attracted by nostalgic memories of the look as well as the sound of the Fairlight, especially the Series II - which is odd for me because nostalgia isn't a strong thing with me. I also think there are features that haven't been explored enough - such as the waveform drawing, which I'd like to work with. And I also think sampling is a misunderstood and undervalued art and has far more potential than most people realise. I'm using it now with instruments I have, and the new Fairlight as the ultimate sampler attracts me. (BTW Grey Seal on my website shows something of what can be done with sampling. I used the Roland V-Synth to make instruments from a grey seal, whales, dolphins and so forth. The first sound is the original grey seal sample, and then you hear it as an instrument playing lead lines, with grey seal accompaniment, followed by frequency shifted whales and so on -  
http://sweep.infinite9ths.com - I'd love to delve deeper into such things with the new Fairlight.)

So yes, there's a certain nostalgia, but also a belief that the Fairlight was underused when it first appeared and far more could have been done with it.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2010, 04:02:54 AM by sweep »

Jaish

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Re: The price of a Fairlight CMI
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2010, 01:11:31 PM »
After reading many of your posts, an old story comes to mind:

An old man who happened to be a famous painter within the art community was displaying his best works at a charity dinner.  A young well-to-do couple were at the event and were amazed by the quality of the art. 

So, they approached the artist to create a painting for them.  The painter explained he was past his heyday and while his name spread rapidly in his early years, he hadn't created anything in a long time, and many had forgotten about him.  However, the young man insisted and described how his Father was always impressed by the artist and how great the original paintings were.

So, on seeing such enthusiasm, the artist agreed and asked the the young couple to come to his studio.  He proceeded to paint a portrait of the couple, and in half an hour he was finished!

The couple were amazed, not only by how quickly he had created the painting, but how great this work was! A masterpiece.  In fact, you may argue that it was his best work to date! 

So, the couple asked how much they owed him for the painting.  The artist refused to take money.  He said it would be a gift. But, being a persistent young man the husband insisted on paying something, anything, even as a token.  So, the artist said, "OK, Fine.  I'll take $17,000 and if you want the easel that I made to display it - another $2000."

"$19,000?!?!  Are you kidding me?!?!" replied the young man.  "I don't want to seem ungrateful, but...it didn't even take you an hour to paint!"

"That's not exactly true." replied the artist, "It has taken me 30 years to create this painting.  Longer, if you include the time I spent learning and perfecting my craft before bringing my first piece into the world.


I am not sure  I need to state the obvious, or at least my opinion but I'm in a writing mood, so I will...

Many of you have praised Fairlight's CMI's in the past and so many people, myself included, are THRILLED that new instrument(s) are on the horizon.  There have been many debates on the worth of the CMI-30A, but really, how can we put a price on that?  If Picasso were still alive, and as a sign of the times now created using a laptop / drawing tablet colour printer, would you still want his "paintings".  Or would you argue that "production" costs / tech had changed and since he's not even using real paint / wood / canvas we should only pay for actual cost?  I doubt it.

Of course, human nature dictates that we always want proof or to see / hear (in this case) examples of what we expect.  But, again, what are our expectations?  I mean, not EVERYONE will be pleased, as is the case with any product, today.  I, for one, have become less of a skeptic, and have faith that this CMI-30A and any instruments that follow will be astounding. 

I take my hat off to Peter's Team and I applaud their continued drive.  I can imagine it to be a difficult journey met with a lot of skepticism, as with other "re-issues"; Moog Voyager, for example, but look where Moog Music are now.  And while I admit I was skeptical about the sound / functions / control of the Voyager, I haven't looked back, since.  Despite what a few are STILL saying, I wouldn't even consider an original MiniMoog.  I think the feeling will be the same when I get my hands on a CMI-30A.  I'm on the wait list, still saving my pennies and I've finally gotten used to the taste of bread and water for dinner.

Oh, and just so you know, I can't draw or paint to save my life.
 :D